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cdb-logo.jpgThe Caribbean region is especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change and needs to find solutions to address its climate, energy and resource challenges. The Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC) is helping by assisting Caribbean countries to create clean technologies and businesses, so that they can better adapt to and plan for the effects of climate change.

Since its inception in 2014, CCIC has been encouraging innovation, entrepreneurship, and supporting economic development through job creation. One of its initiatives is regionally held boot camps, which bring together young entrepreneurs to find business solutions to climate change.

“In 2016 we were in Jamaica, Trinidad, Saint Lucia, Antigua, Dominica, and Belize. The first one was held in Jamaica and it was a huge success, we had over 75 participants. To date, we have impacted on over 300 entrepreneurs, and we have seven winners which automatically qualify for our accelerator programmes,” said Carlington Burrell, Project Manager, CCIC.

cdb-logo.jpgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados -- A technology incubation programme that provides business support services for young entrepreneurs in Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean and Haiti is open for applications. The Caribbean Tech Entrepreneurship Programme (CTEP) is an initiative of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre. It tailors support for participants according to the stage at which the entrepreneur or firm is currently operating.

Following the success of a youth technology employment programme in Jamaica, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the World Bank have established a tech programme to provide business support services for young entrepreneurs in Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean and Haiti.

CDB said applications are now open for the Caribbean Tech Entrepreneurship Programme (CTEP), which tailors support for participants according to the stage at which the entrepreneur or firm is currently operating.

In a release, CDB said CTEP addresses two main problems faced by youth – the lack of appropriate job opportunities and the lack of a regional strategy to promote entrepreneurship and innovation.

The Bank said it follows the successful Youth Employment in Digital Animation Industries project in Jamaica.

Participants from Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines are eligible to apply.

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC) — The Barbados-based Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) on Monday announced it was inviting applications from young entrepreneurs in several regional countries to participate in a technology incubation programme that provides business support services.

It said that the Caribbean Tech Entrepreneurship Programme (CTEP) is an initiative of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the World Bank Group in partnership with the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre and is intended for small entrepreneurs in Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean and Haiti.

“It tailors support for participants according to the stage at which the entrepreneur or firm is currently operating. CTEP addresses two main problems faced by youth: the lack of appropriate job opportunities and the lack of a regional strategy to promote entrepreneurship and innovation,” the CDB said.

CTEP has partnered with the Caribbean Climate Innovation Center (CCIC) to be a part of its Entrepreneurship programme which focuses on Tech Startups. Teams selected to be a part of this programme will participate in a three-month incubation programme, including capacity building workshops and mentorship support, to prepare them for a Regional Competition, where a panel of regional and international judges will choose the best Caribbean Startups. CTEP caters to tech entrepreneurs from the Member States of the OECS, Barbados and Haiti at three critical stages of their business cycle, that is, the Idea, Validation, and Revenue stages.

ST. GEORGE’S, Grenada, Sept 6, CMC – Grenada is hosting the CARICOM Climate Change Negotiators and Ministerial preparatory meeting in preparation for the Conference of Parties (COP) for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which will be held in Morocco this year.

The three-day conference, which began on Monday, is being attended by representatives from 12 countries as well as the Belize-based Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and the Guyana-based CARICOM Secretariat.

 

when discussing the scale of the energy challenge around the world, some huge numbers come up. Getting a steady supply of electricity that is secure, affordable and low in carbon is going to cost a pretty penny. Many energy companies are scrambling towards global and institutional investors to source funds for these power projects. However, there is a more practical resource that does not get enough mention when it comes to solar energy systems: the people.

Hydroelectric dam Cachi in Costa RicaCosta Rica has achieved 150 days of electricity production entirely through renewable energy sources this year.

The Central American country was powered on carbon-free electricity for 76 days straight from June 17, according to the Costa Rica Electricity Institute (ICE).

In August, just over 80 per cent of their electricity came from hydro sources, while geothermal power contributed nearly 13 per cent of electrical power.

Jamaica has received from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) for capacity-building support to the tune of US$300,000 for the Climate Change Division, acting as national designed authority (NDA) with the fund.

The new boss at the division, Una May Gordon, made the revelation in an interview with The Gleaner earlier this week.

Biodiversity, Colombia, Rare, sustainable development, ecotourism, water scarcity, water stewardship, water security, groundwater, Leon KayeThe water that accumulates in Colombia’s Andes Mountains provides fresh water for 75 percent of the country’s 47 million people. That water is also the life source for over 1,800 birds and 2 million species of flora and fauna. The incredible variety of plants and wildlife is why Colombia is ranked by most researchers as being within the 10 nations richest in biodiversity – or what some scientists even describe as “megadiverse.”

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